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brother's district he dropped it from 45% latino down to 31% latino, his brother would be safe and wouldn't face a challenge in the democratic primary by a latino candidate. another thing he did is got democrats and republicans together to pursue incumbent power so in other words sometimes we see these gerrymanders meaning one part is trying to pick up as many seats as possible, in california in that particular year basically the democrats get together with the republicans and they said let's not push for party gains but preserve our own seat and focus on incumbent gerrymandering and draw districts that benefit us so we are not challenged. that's burma. >> what role to the computers play in the current election system? is it good or not so good? >> computers are a tool so i think they can be great and they can also cause problems. with people like michael berman they can do more than ever. they have much more data, they can map things much more easily before people used to guess and estimate about the census and where people lived and taking the data from the list and putting it on a map
in northeast los angeles. it was predominantly a latino community. >> mostly illegal? >> i think it was a combination. there were a lot of immigrant families, but you know there were also legal and illegal family's. >> how did illegals view the illegals? >> i am not so sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults. but what i do remember the most is being shy when i got to school. most of the kids in my classroom or dark-skinned and they look just like me and they had lost names like rcn gonzalez and hernandez and they could speak a language that i could not speak. that was really shocking to me because they looked exactly like me and yet they weren't. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of of the fact that there were a latino's, but they were different from me. >> you were in the esl classes, english as a second language classes? >> yes. >> was that a second class citizen type thing? >> yeah, definitely. being an esl student, that is who you are and that is the way people treat you, like an
los angeles. it was predominately latino community. >> host: mostly illegal? >> guest: i think it was a combination. yeah, there were a lot of immigrant families, but they're also legal legal and illegal families. >> host: out of the legal dispute the ev goes? >> guest: i'm not too sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults. but what i do remember the most is being shocked when i got to school at that most of the kids in my classroom were dark skinned than that of the show slake me and they had last names like garcia and gonzalez and fernandez and they could speak a language i couldn't speak. and i was really shocking to me because they looked exactly like me and get newer. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of the fact that they were latinos, but they were different from me. >> host: viewer in esl classes come english as a second language classes? was that -- was not a second-class class citizen type thing? >> guest: yeah, definitely. being an esl student is who you are and that way pe
. it particularly left of african-americans and latinos who were actually excluded from those programs or the programs despite lobbying by the liberals in the day and the naacp, the programs didn't prohibit discrimination. we know some of the suburbs we went to to have our golden age had covenants, so a lot of white people don't remember the extent to which the government helped them rise. my irish catholic family rose from desperate poverty to the middle class and literally one generation, but you've got this divide where a lot of people don't realize that they got help then you have african-americans and latinos pointing to the help they got and this terrible communication gap. how can you say you didn't get something that i didn't even know you got. that's a big problem i want the book to start to talk about. the other thing we don't think about enough and the first meaning of the title is the extent to which we all -- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am
: in highland park in northeast los angeles, and it was predominantly a latino community. >> host: mostly illegal? >> guest: i think it was a combination, yeah, there were a lot of immigrant families, but, you know, there were also the legal and illegal families. >> host: how did the legals view the illegals? >> guest: i'm not too sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults, but what i do remember the most is being shocked when i got to school that most of the kids in my classroom were dark skin, and they looked just like me and had names like garcia and hernandez, and they could speak a language i couldn't speak. that was shocking to me because they looked exactly like me, and, yet, they weren't. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of the fact that they were latinos, but they were different from me. >> host: you were in esl classes? english as a second language classes? >> guest: yeah. >> host: was that a second class citizen type thing? being in that class? >> guest: definitely, being an esl stude
conversations among the students and that the african-american kids and the latino kids who get these preferences are going to say something to the white kids and the asian kids that is it just has overwhelming compelling educational benefits. that's it. that is the university of texas is are doing. that is the exception to the principal of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized to. i think that is ridiculous. and indeed there are social scientists of their. increasingly these educational benefits, which, you know me get only a marginal and provide to education are disputed it's important for the court to bear in mind, and the court jurisprudence is moving this way that even if there are some educational benefits the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination something is compelling and if an interest is compelling and, you got to consider the inherent liabilities and the racial discrimination that involves to crime. what are some of the costs of racial discrimination and the university missions? why should notice by heart but i don't and this is
-age children, the westminster school had 628 anglo students and just 14 of latino heritage while the hoover school had 152 students,al of them latino. -- all of them latino. the suit was filed pre-brown, and thus in an era where the supreme court continued to sanction separate but equal schools. nevertheless, a district judge in los angeles struck down the mexican schools on the argument that they did violate the equal protection clause, and he was upheld on much narrower grounds by the ninth circuit. that could have ended the matter, but the ninth circuit's ruling did not force the state to address other aspects of discrimination in its schools. and as a result, if it had settled there, the state education code would still have included language that permitted separate schools for chinese and other asian students. instead, in june of 1947, warren signed the legislation that struck that language and ended all formal racial segregation in california schools. so the warren who managed the warren court, who came to the court in '53 knew racism in schools and most importantly, i think, in the c
conversations among students and that the african-american kids and latino kids who get these preferences are going to say something to the white kids and the asian kids that is -- just as overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. i think that is ridiculous. and indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say it is true, it really happens. increasingly these educational benefits which made only marginal improvement to education are disputed. it is increasingly disputed that there are educational benefits but it is also important for the court to bear in mind and the court's jurisprudence -- even if there are educational benefits, they have got to be weighed against the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling, you got to consider the inherent liabilities in racial discrimination that it involved too, right? what are the costs of racial discr
shifts but we are in the same boat now. final analysis, it doesn't matter we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether we are a democrat or republican. it doesn't matter whether we are straight or gay. it doesn't matter whether we are jewish or muslim or christians. we are one people, one family, one house. [applause] this book "across that bridge" in effect our struggle is not a struggle to redeem the soul of america. it's not a struggle that lasts one day, one week, one month or one lifetime. maybe you would take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union, to create the beloved community. and you heard david tell you why did get a rest at few times, and young people, young children say how can you be in the congress if you got arrested? [laughter] you violated the law. and i said they were bad laws. their customs, they were tradition, and we wanted america to be better to live up to the declaration of independence, make real our democracy. when i got arrested the first time this books and i felt free. i felt liberated and today
latino book award. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. as we enter these last few months, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove. he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. here in new york are not going to see much of it. it will be spent in the battleground state. he has become king of the super pacs. $1.8 billion. to put that into perspective, in 2008, mccain had 375 million to spend. this is a factor of five. you're going to start seeing it come out now. the other thing that i wanted to discuss his who is he, what does he do? he is a political operative. well, how does he operate? what does he do? and i talked to a couple of sources about that. one, who is one of the victims, said that there is a dark and terrible beauty about what he does. and i had another was a former cia agent who told me that you know, the cia could learn a lot from karl rove. in the way that he has deniability and all these operations that he does, he is very visible, he is something like 70% of name recognit
. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award, on growing an illegal alien in los angeles, sunday night. part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> here's a look at books being published. mark bowden, author of black hawk down, chronicles the hunt for osama bin laden called, the finish. the killing of osama bin laden. journalist michael dons recounts the last six months of world war ii and the beginning of the cold war, six months in 1945, from world war to cold war. >> and william skinner one of the founders of the american silk industry. a man who turned disaster into destiny. >> in master of the mountain, thomas jefferson and his slaves, historian winecheck friends the findings of recent archaeological work at jefferson's estate, monticello, and a science writer writes about the search for earth's twin. look for these titles in the coming week. >> 50 years ago, president job john f. kennedy was in the midst of the cuban missle crisis. >> george ball, johnson, george bundy. >> it's the 50th anniversary of the cuban missile crisis. with historyian, scholars, film
, it being a midterm year, a lot of latino voters stayed home, and there was a big tea party movements in the corpus area, and he won after a runoff by about 800 or 900 votes. >> cb solomon of -- solomon ortiz senior. >> that's exactly right. yes. but he arrived because first he was inexperienced in the ways of governance or politics at large. he arrives three and half weeks after everybody else did because of the recount, and so i followed a lot of these congressman around to get a sense of the irrational experience, and his was one of the kind of citizen politicians to try as you might can never quite catch up. always just sort of, you know, holding on to the medicine ball for dear life and never kind of getting a top of it. he was -- i mean, he told me he had this recurring nightmare that he was alone in his office and there was no furniture and only a phone that rang and rang and rang and he was never able to get it. he told a group of business lobbyists. you know you have that anxiety. dreams are really big. you know, that anxiety dream of going to school and looking down and not
probably a large turnout. a latino vote that will end up 75 to 25. we have different country. that's part of the racial mix. i think we have time for one more. >> i have something to say about that. i have something to say about everything. [laughter] i'm sorry i know i blab teach. how much time left? five minutes. [inaudible] they can ask you questions when they buy your book. that's right. you can do that. i brought a pen and i'm from kansas, i'm allowed to say that. i brought a pen and i will be signing bocks later. interesting thing. we can see the demographic change in the country are going toward the democrat when you talk to them in d.c. they are so what if we lose or that. we lost the election, you know, and there's, you know, conservative are doing the things. who cares, frank, they say. who cares. the future is ours. democrat will win the election in of the future. the republicans will no doubt twinned things won't stay the same. republicans aren't stupid. and they, you know, they can see what's happening as well as. did you second of all, the power of money. it's the one thing
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13